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on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. roth would read the newspaper and about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [
on the part of the public. why has the city never been able to get its arms around that level of fraud and abuse and what does it say for the expansion of government? >> it is expenses -- expensive to weed out the fraud and abuse. it takes a lot of government time and money. i do think it is worth doing. her we do not do it nearly enough. but it has been something -- government, at times, is wasteful in what it does not do as much as it is in what it does do. it never is risen to the top level as i think it should and hope it does. one of the reasons i did not want a government-run option is because that would have been a dumping ground for another government program to provide insurance and move away from the private market. i believe in the private market for insurance. there are cases where people are not insurable in the private market, that you have a government program. that is why it came about. " we are capable of crunching numbers to figure out how you cover people of a certain age block of have an entire barac them. we were able to find a way to do it through a private market
in a very densely populated region of new york city, long island, and the southern portions of new york state. and so i think it's a stark reminder, a very real example, a very painful outcome that speaks to the need of investing, investing in our infrastructure. and so as we go forward there's also an opportunity to improve upon what existed at the time of these storms. for instance, in the energy networks, utility networks, we can do state of the art. we have taught other nations how to build those systems. it's time to do nation building at home. and i think the beauty here is that while we invest in transportation and other infrastructure, energy infrastructure and water systems and treatment centers and treatment systems and public schools, what we're doing is rippling into the benefits of efficiency, of public safety, of employment and economic development. that is a positive series of dynamics that then lifts the economy and provides for work. 90% of the jobs, it's projected, that come from this sort of infrastructure investment are speaking to middle income households. jobs that
cities and towns. in the 11th congressional district which i represent in new york city, the new york city police department reported 274 victims from 226 incidents involving gun violence. and that was in two neighborhoods in the district that i represent. the majority of these crimes were registered in just two communities. 274 victims from 226 incidents. now, fortunately, not everyone perished in these incidents, but one incident leads to many and the repercussions and trauma to those who witnessed these incidents who dooged a bullet in our community, is immeasurable. we have the authority to focus our efforts on penalties for gun trafficking and unlawful sales of firearms. we have the authority to prevent the retail sale of assault weapons and high capacity magazines or clips designed for military combat use and we have the ability to register handguns and microstamp munitions to trace ownership and origin. we have the authority. we only need to have the courage to act. the newtown tragedy has highlighted a vexing issue that we as americans must address. it is imperative that we se
and cities and towns will be protected going into 2013 tax year, the 2012 tax year. but what it means is middle class americans will now have a 2,000-plus, $2,200, going into january. i want to move to eligibility. that's been batted around. i really want to come here today, i was home over the weekend, i said, i have to get to washington to convey the thoughts and the minds of my constituents not only the average citizens but doctors who i sat down with yesterday to ask about this question. but here's my point. now you can look at'9" globally, then i'm going to narrow it down. globally one would say that we're living longer. of course women are -- this is the actuarial genius here. you know the actuarial table you teal with. women are living longer, it's always been a tradition, etc., but the body politic is living longer maybe because they're healthier. that is not the case in the span of what we're speaking of. what we're talking about tpwhreblely or nationally are people who -- whose beginnings are different, whose lifestyles were different, now i don't know that the family farmer
small towns and big cities all across america every day. since friday morning, a police officer was gunned down in memphis, leaving four children without their mother. two officers were killed outside a grocery store in topeka. a woman was shot and killed inside a las vegas casino. three people were shot inside an alabama hospital. a four-year-old was caught in a drive-by in missouri, and taken off life support just yesterday. each one of these americans was a victim of the everyday gun violence that takes the lives of more than 10,000 americans every year -- violence that we cannot accept as routine. so i will use all the powers of this office to help advance efforts aimed at preventing more tragedies like this. we won't prevent them all -- but that can't be an excuse not to try. it won't be easy -- but that can't be an excuse not to try. and i'm not going to be able to do it by myself. ultimately if this effort is to succeed it's going to require the help of the american people -- it's going to require all of you. if we're going to change things, it's going to take a wave of a
. in the central northern part of your state and in and around the city and southeastern connecticut. many studies have shown that after housing, transportation is the second-largest drop on a family's paycheck. in terms of the availability and affordability of transportation, it is absolutely elemental to the economic health of the area. as you pointed out, we are talking about more than 10% of the nation's g.d.p. in that area. >> what would you think? i know you have helped do damage assessments. i know you have visited with us and others in the region in terms of reviewing the damage personally. do you think the transit system could possibly be rebuilt and protected with less than 1/3 of the budget? >> no. in fact, we took note of one of the amendments that would cut the request by more than 70%, specifically in a transit emergency relief. that amount would not even cover the recovery estimates that we currently have, much less get to any of the necessary mitigation investments requested under the president. >> that amount would not even cover the recovery? >> just the restoration and recovery
was very controversial, as most things in america were. the man who designed washington city -- there was competition. he submitted a design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly odd inspiring. in fact, in 1821, a european diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor on inspiring. -- awe-inspiring. the congressman answered, the building served its purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> a former new york times book critic has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos. what sunday evening, at 7:30 eastern and pacific, on american history tv. >> the american enterprise institute heard from the incoming and outgoing chairman of the republican study committee today. they talked about what they would like to see in a tax and budget deal, and what is ahead for house republicans in the next congress. this is 50 minutes. >> i am delighted to welcome you to a presentation by the outgoing and incoming chairman of the republican study committee of the u.s
culture of the new york capital city of albany this weekend on book-tv on c-span 2 and american history tv on c-span 3. today on c-span, "washington journal" next. james taylor will be at the national press club and this evening, a discussion about skilled immigrants with mark warner and aol founder steve case. in 45 minutes, the national correspondent for "fiscal times" on the fiscal cliff negotiations, a discussion and a look at the future energy production and consumption in
, as a do-gooder state, was not penalized. also for dish, i wanted to make sure that york city was not penalized. the new york medicaid program already covers most categories of individuals beyond the expansion threshold in the affordable care act. however, it is projected that after the aca is fully implemented in new york, 10% of our residents will still remain uninsured, which means that dish funding will still remain important. ms. mann, i know you and i spoke about this a few weeks ago. i just want to reiterate how important this is for states that already have broad eligibility for medicaid programs. as you know, that is a very big concern of mine. i hope these requirements will not punish these states. let me ask dr. sharfstein and dr. allison, can you talk about how declining funding for uncompensated care and dish influenced your decision to push the medicaid expansion in your states? >> just to give one example from maryland. we have a unique way of funding uncompensated care, about $1 billion a year in uncompensated care goes into a pool on the hospital side. there i
without power. in many parts of the city in the region, we're really pushing back the decades and it is hard to understand unless you have been there. i think the speaker is sensitive to that, the remarks are very positive that we need to address the needs of the people. i would hope that this would not get embroiled in what already seems to be insurmountable problems. this needs to be addressed immediately. >> the moment when the people look to the public sector to say, do we really have this contact? are you there for us? when the storms hit last time, the members came to us and said the devastation was so great, it changed the character of our community. the same thing can happen now unless we are there for the people. i agree with you that the speaker has been gracious and open with what i have heard has to honoring the social compact that we are there in times of natural disaster to remove doubt in people's mind that this will not be a political debate but a values debate. $700 billion for the tar funding. the chairman of the fed said that if i don't act immediately, we w
weeks ago i was giving a speech at a fancy hotel in new york city. when i arrived in the banquet hall, i was approached by a group of u employees like the ones were working here tonight in the hotel's catering department. they had heard the story and had a gift for me. it presented me with this employee name tag -- rubio, bartender. [laughter] [applause] do you know what this reminds me of? this reminds me that there are millions of marco rubio's out there. they are not looking for a handout. all they want is a chance to vie for their families, that there are not enough jobs out there. many do not have the skills for jobs that are available. they want a chance to earn a life for themselves in a better future for the children. what better chance than now? it all starts with the people in the kitchens of our hotels and the landscaping crews that work in our neighborhoods and the late-night janitorial shifts that clean our offices -- that is where you will find the genes that america was built upon -- dreams that america was built on. their journey is our nation's destiny. if they can gave
served our efforts in this city and at home in indiana for the past 12 years. i leave this body truly humbled. when i look back at the caliber of the staff that we have been able to call to this mission. servant leaders all. they are men and women who approach each and every day with a servant's heart, made sacrifices over the years in order to serve the people of indiana with integrity and energy. names like bill smith and lonnie zanarky. josh pickcok, paul teller, mark short, brian neal, just to name a few. you know, i don't have time tonight to name all the men and women who served us in various capacities over these last 12 years, but i would ask unanimous consent to submit each and every one of their names to the congressional record this night. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. pence: before i yield the floor for the last time, let me close simply by speaking a word of confidence and one more word of gratitude. some people look on in washington, d.c., and they are rightly frustrated. some people can't come to this nation's capital -- some people can com
cable satellite corp. 2012] >> explore the history and literary culture of new york's capitol city albany. this week on "book tv" and american history tv. up next on c-span, shaun donovan discusses the finances of the federal housing administration. then the senate debate on that debt ceiling. followed by the joint economic committee hearing on the so- called fiscal cliff. >> extended unemployment benefits for workers who have been jobless for more than 26 weeks expire in january. the exploration -- the expiration is part of fiscal cliff. on "washington journal", we will look at the expiring unemployment benefits. then our roundtable with michael tanner of the cato institute. "washington journal" is live every day on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the chief of staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated the land on -- would cost 250,000 of our men, and 500,000 on -- >> as harry truman's grandson, i have to choose to honor -- the sacrifice and the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific a
washington city, there was competition. he submitted a design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly are inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor of inspiring. but the answer. the congressman dave said, the building served a purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become a permanent resident. >> vicki goldberg has gathered a few of her favorite photos in the president's home and photographs and history. watch at 7:30 on american history tv. john boehner's office described a meeting with president obama as a frank talk. he spoke to reporters about fiscal cliff negotiations, criticizing president obama for not being serious on cutting spending and lending herrmann the lack of an agreement. lawmakers have less than three weeks before the bush era tax cuts are set to expire and mandatory spending cuts take effect. this is about 10 minutes. >> good morning, everyone. more than five weeks ago, republicans signaled our willingness to avert the fiscal cliff with a bipartisan ag
an even s, and what helped me was the following. and did volunteer work in boston city hospital in the pediatric ward. these were very young people who had ailments ranging from leukemia and orthopedic problems -- there was a little boy who was born without facial features. he had a hole for a nose, no real eyes and mouth. he looked frightening. his parents never came to see him. when i would go, i would visit him. i had time to think, and i began to understand that everyone has a cross to bear. >> does that help you with problems you have yourself? >> because if i am healthy, i cannot get so depressed. in the end, i am motivated by other people. that is why i love being the president of the university. >> what is the key to motivation? parents want to know. teachers want to know. we want you to motivate these guys out here. >> you have to try to reach them where they are, but you have to help them understand their talents. in the process, they can be personally successful. >> yousuf it is golden when you are willing to marry something you are good at with something you are will
house but are in your neighborhood. your cities. our states, the vibrancy of our country. and we are headed over the fiscalliff after four years of leadership from this president who is running, running directly to the fiscal cliff. has even said, and secretary of treasury said, we don't mind jumping off this cliff. mr. speaker, we should not be having that kind of attitude. we should have the attitude that we are for everybody. we want to be for american trepreneurship and especially small business because it's small business, family farms, small business electrical companies, people who put their name on the buildings, creativity. people get up to go to work every day. that's who we are going to hurt. we are not just going to hurt them, we are going to hurt their business families. people who they have h employed, small communities, large communities, but small business which is the engine of our economy. that's really who we are going to punish. lastly, we should not do it at this time just like we should not have two years ago, but i guess we were aiming for an election at th
for city council, for school boards, for municipal government that go unfilled every year because people don't run for them. and you can start anywhere. so i would say to all the women in the audience, to all of your children, to all of your girls cannot tell them to run because that is how we will get aoman president pierre >> that is a great point pierre >> i had 24 hours to make my decision about running the first time for state senate. i would not have run. i called my husband and said they asked me care at the kids and the law practice and you have your job. and my husband said you are really did this and we will make it work. >> the corollary about the minivan and the phone, my boys, when there were little, they used to say, mom, you are always on the phone. i told them that i get paid by the word. [laughter] >> i would not have run for senate if it were not for my husband. i quit my role as attorney general entered a year-and-a- half off of work. we went from one income -- we went from two incomes to one income. he said, i will make it work. i want your voicehere. it does take som
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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